Weekly Journal July 27 – Productivity

LumberTribe Journal #20-31 Productivity

My weekly blog post routine includes posting links to great content I came across during the week.

A lot of people that I know uses the calendar. This is also a tool that Asian Efficiency would always share with our more than 13,000 customers. Even my 74-year-old mother uses the calendar to keep track of when she needs to harvest her crops. I’m talking about the Facebook game FarmVille. She also uses the calendar to keep track of when she and her sisters are supposed to have a call via FB Messenger.

I was getting ready to start my day this morning when I got tempted to switch out a light bulb.

However, this wasn’t just a simple light bulb. It is one of those fancy Wi-Fi-enabled bulbs that would allow my Alexa system to control one of the lights in my office area.

I picked up the bulb and then realized that what I thought would take just a few minutes was probably going to take a half-hour or more to set up, connect to Alexa, and program to my office home-automation scenes.

This one little task was going to disrupt my morning planning and work session.

I put it the bulb back down on the shelf and went back to my work.

Even before I was diagnosed with ADHD, the question “have you tried writing a list?” would set me on edge. I’m all for innovative productivity hacks, and for well-meaning neurotypical people, getting something done can often be as easy as writing a list, but as Edward Hallowell, M.D., psychiatrist and ADHD expert tells SELF, things aren’t that simple for people with ADHD—which, by the way, includes him: “Most of the organizational strategies we implement fail because they’re boring,” he says. And people with ADHD, he explains, cannot tolerate boredom. That intolerance leads to “supercharged version of procrastination, to the point of jeopardizing work and relationships.”

I don’t go into depth about the finds but encourage you to check them out if they sound interesting.

These are my weekly favorites; I would love to hear about some of yours.

d then realized that what I thought would take just a few minutes was probably going to take a half-hour or more to set up, connect to Alexa, and program to my office home-automation scenes.

This one little task was going to disrupt my morning planning and work session.

I put it the bulb back down on the shelf and went back to my work.

Even before I was diagnosed with ADHD, the question “have you tried writing a list?” would set me on edge. I’m all for innovative productivity hacks, and for well-meaning neurotypical people, getting something done can often be as easy as writing a list, but as Edward Hallowell, M.D., psychiatrist and ADHD expert tells SELF, things aren’t that simple for people with ADHD—which, by the way, includes him: “Most of the organizational strategies we implement fail because they’re boring,” he says. And people with ADHD, he explains, cannot tolerate boredom. That intolerance leads to “supercharged version of procrastination, to the point of jeopardizing work and relationships.”

I don’t go into depth about the finds but encourage you to check them out if they sound interesting.

These are my weekly favorites; I would love to hear about some of yours.

and then realized that what I thought would take just a few minutes was probably going to take a half-hour or more to set up, connect to Alexa, and program to my office home-automation scenes.

This one little task was going to disrupt my morning planning and work session.

I put it the bulb back down on the shelf and went back to my work.

Even before I was diagnosed with ADHD, the question “have you tried writing a list?” would set me on edge. I’m all for innovative productivity hacks, and for well-meaning neurotypical people, getting something done can often be as easy as writing a list, but as Edward Hallowell, M.D., psychiatrist and ADHD expert tells SELF, things aren’t that simple for people with ADHD—which, by the way, includes him: “Most of the organizational strategies we implement fail because they’re boring,” he says. And people with ADHD, he explains, cannot tolerate boredom. That intolerance leads to “supercharged version of procrastination, to the point of jeopardizing work and relationships.”

I don’t go into depth about the finds but encourage you to check them out if they sound interesting.

These are my weekly favorites; I would love to hear about some of yours.

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